Frequently Asked Questions

How should video rank in terms of a priority when planning my event?
Great question....Recently a survey conducted by Breakthrough Marketing Inc., reveals that 54% of brides raked video as one of the top ten most important. After the wedding, the number went up to 79% , and 43% of those moved it from the top Ten to the top Five most important. Its value is definitely comparable to photography, and in some respects, even more valuable. For more information, click on this story > "Nationwide Bridal Survey Reveals Value of Videography".

Why should I hire you when my photographer and/or DJ said they could sell me a video package fairly cheap?
This one is simple. Photographers and DJ's, and anyone else who specializes in their craft, is not a videographer. You shouldn't go to them for your video anymore than you would go to them to buy flowers or your cake. It's simply not what they do. Studios and wedding centers that sell video are concerned about one thing, and that is making more money. Only a professional videographer cares about their craft and can give you the high quality product you are looking for...More heartbreak and disappointment has come to many a bride who was fooled by an offer for a cheap video, only to get a product that is only good to sit on a shelf.

Why should I choose more than one camera?
If you watch TV or go to a movie, this answer will be obvious. The reason movies and TV shows keep your interest is because the camera angles are constantly changing. At a live event, it becomes important also as a back-up...not just for a camera failure - but because there are always times the camera angle becomes obstructed by guests, photographers or other service providers at the event. Try to include enough in the budget for your video to add that 2nd camera.......the more cameras....the better the movie!

Will the video equipment be distracting during the ceremony?
Because today's digital portable video equipment is compact and silent, the most important consideration is whether or not the videographer has the skill to avoid intruding on the ceremony. We strongly feel that both the ceremony and reception should be taped in as unobtrusive a manner as possible. For example, the videographer should not move about a lot during the ceremony - the camera should remain stationary on the tripod. Many people are concerned about the use of flood lamps during the ceremony. We agree that this is not appropriate. We use professional cameras which can produce superior images in all but the most dimly lit interiors without video lamps.

We want to hear our vows on the video, will this be possible if the camera is placed away from the altar?
If only the camera's built-in microphone is used, your vows would most likely be inaudible since these microphones lose clarity at distances beyond 7-10 feet. We utilize broadcast quality wireless microphones, generally worn by the groom or officiant. These provide excellent quality.

We are being married at a candlelight ceremony, and the church lights are not very bright. How will the video look?
Although video cameras produce their best images when there is ample light, our professional low-light cameras do remarkably well in most churches and synagogues. However, you can expect that the colors on your tape will not be as vivid as those you see on broadcast TV, there is also a slight loss of picture sharpness.

How important is it for the videographer to attend the rehearsal?
It is not absolutely necessary to have the videographer at your rehearsal, however it is beneficial as it gives them the opportunity to see exactly how everything will be done. This enables them to avoid unpleasant surprises, such as having an attendant block the view of the couple during the vows. If your budget does not permit having your rehearsal taped, you might invite the videographers to your rehearsal dinner - telling them the time of the rehearsal. They will probably bring a camera, and it will give them an opportunity to get to know your wedding party.

You offer an edited tape, why would we need editing since we want to see all the scenes that were recorded?
As we use the term, editing does not mean the removal of un-usable scenes from the tape. Rather, editing weddings involves the following:

The addition of titles, music, still photos, graphics, etc.

The elimination of "glitches" which would detract from the tape. For example, a cameraman leaves the tape running while rushing to capture a spontaneous scene at the reception - this footage is edited out.

Editing can be used creatively to give a tape better pacing. For example, a lengthy scene of guests dancing can be "broken up" and made more interesting by editing in interviews with guests every few minutes.

A well-edited video looks far more polished and thus will be more entertaining and enjoyable to watch. Unedited videos always have an amateurish quality.

Will the video images fade over time?
Because both video and audio information are recorded magnetically, the videotape will last indefinitely with no loss of quality if it is properly stored. You can also choose to have us record it on a DVD. What other technical factors should we be aware of when choosing a wedding video service? First, a professional video company will use professional equipment, as opposed to consumer level equipment. This includes cameras, recorders, tripods, and editing/duplicating systems. The ceremony should always be recorded using a fluid head tripod, which allows the camera to move smoothly and eliminates distracting jitters and jumps seen on amateur tapes. The videographer should have a camera-mounted video light for use at the reception when necessary. This can make a significant difference in video quality. Our professional cameras no longer need the floodlights - a 20 watt light can produce sufficient lighting.

What other technical factors should we be aware of when choosing a wedding video service?
First, a professional video company will use professional equipment, as opposed to consumer level equipment. This includes cameras, recorders, tripods, and editing/duplicating systems. The ceremony should always be recorded using a fluid head tripod, which allows the camera to move smoothly and eliminates distracting jitters and jumps seen on amateur tapes. The videographer should have a camera-mounted video light for use at the reception when necessary. This can make a significant difference in video quality. Our professional cameras no longer need the floodlights - a 20 watt light can produce sufficient lighting.

Is there that much difference between video companies? Why shouldn't we just choose the company with the lowest price?
A wedding can't be restaged for the camera if the sound on the tape is inaudible, the colors are distorted, a battery runs out of power, or the videographer hasn't planned his camera placement and misses key parts of the ceremony. You should be aware that many people in the business of videotaping weddings are amateurs using non-professional equipment. Such individuals often do not have the technical background and experience to do the job well. The person you hire should also have excellent interpersonal skills, as they will be interacting with you, your family, the presiding official, and your still photographer. When looking for a professional wedding video service, we strongly recommend that you view sample tapes.

Video Isn't Expensive....It's Priceless!

Top of Page